O+ Festival- October 6 – 8

Eigth Annual O+ Festival:

LINEUP: http://opositivefestival.org/kingston/#lineup
ALL-ACCESS WRISTBANDS: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/o-kingston-tickets-36246496246 

Make a donation for an O+ wristband, your all-access pass to:

50+ bands including DeerhoofSteve GunnAbdu AliWHITE HILLSThe Big Takeover & The Mammals

20+ installation, performing and mural artists, including Vince Ballentine,Nani ChaconJane Bloodgood-AbramsJia SungThe Art of Matthew Pleva, Justin Suarez & Enz

Cycling events, EXPLO+RE classes in yoga, dance, meditation & more, HO+ME Economics Conference with the Good Work Institute & Literary SALO+N

The Kingston festival is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the nonproft O+, which empowers communities to take control of their collective wellbeing through the exchange of "the art of medicine for the medicine of art."

Advance donations come with great thank YO+U gifts, including cycling T-shirts, 124O+1 racerbacks, T-shirts and hoodies, You Can't Buy CO+MMUNITY tote bags, DO+NOR cards and forever wristbands.

Learn more at: https://www.facebook.com/events/1994788007400913

CHRONOGRAM BLOCK PARTY, SAT AUG 19TH!

The Chronogram Block Party is BACK for year 5! They're starting 1 hour earlier and bringing back some of your favorite summer staple activities! 

Live music from The Sweet ClementinesJ.K. VanderbiltThe Ballroom ThievesQuincy MumfordDecoraCenter for Creative Education - Arts with a purpose, and more! This year's Emcee will be Julie Novak of theTMI Project! Don't forget about our beachball drop presented byButtermilk Falls Inn & Spa and Henry's at Buttermilk Falls

Beer and wine garden with beer from Keegan Ales and Lagunitas Brewing Co, cider from Angry Orchard, wine from Benmarl Winery and Vineyard, soft drinks provided by Drink More Good, and more!

Dunk tank to benefit People's Place presented by Wallace & Feldman Ins., DIY art tent from Catskill Art & Office Supply, food from Farmers & Chefs Food TrucksDiego's Taqueria KingstonCinnamon Indian cuisine,Yum Yum Noodle BarLa Ruta Del Sol, Chronogram cover cut-outs and more! 

Special thanks for their sponsors - Mother Earth's StorehouseButtermilk Falls Inn & SpaHerzog's Home CenterThomas F Cingel DDSLagunitas Brewing CoAngry OrchardRhinebeck BankUlster County Tourism, NY,Radio Woodstock 100.1 WDSTBest Western Plus Kingston Hotel and Conference CenterHamilton & AdamsIDEA LAB POP UP SHOP, Kingston NY during the summer block party!Smorgasburg Upstate, and of course the City of Kingston for your support!

SEE MORE AT: https://www.facebook.com/events/456289668037939

LUCKY BUG CLOTHING MOTHER’S DAY TRUNK SHOW- May 13

Lucky Bug Clothing is hosting a Trunk Show to celebrate their recent launch. Held the day before Mother’s Day at the Karina Dresses shop, it is the perfect opportunity to shop both companies’ new collections and find last minute gifts. Both Karina Dresses and Lucky Bug Clothing will be offering 10% off merchandise during the event. Beverages and light snacks will be served, and a polaroid keepsake will be offered to take pictures of families at the event.

May 13th, 2017- 03/13/17 //  12 PM - 4 PM
Karina Dresses Shop - 329 Wall St., Kingston, NY 12401

About Lucky Bug:  Lucky Bug Clothing Company makes soft, adorable baby clothing and accessories that are ethically produced in the USA, so that you and the child in your life can both be comfortable. Made of organic bamboo viscose fabric, they are dedicated to ethical manufacturing in the U.S. They have just launched in late April 2017 and want to celebrate with the Hudson Valley community. To learn more visit Lucky Bug, or call us at 845-505-4051.

May 24 - Sunset Cruise on Kingston's Onrust Yacht, Fundraiser

May 24, 2017

Replica Dutch Yacht Onrust

Proceeds of Sunset Sail Benefit Museum Education Programs Kingston, NY – The Hudson River Maritime Museum announces a fundraising sail on board the replica Dutch yacht Onrust on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 starting at 5:00 PM and leaving from the Museum’s docks.  Come to the Museum at 5:00 pm for wine and light refreshments while you peruse our new exhibits, then board the Onrust at 5:30 pm for a beautiful sunset cruise. Learn about the history of Adriaen Block, 17th century Dutch explorer of New York, and the disaster of the Tyger while you enjoy the beautiful Hudson River.  The Onrust is a historically accurate replica of Adriaen Block’s 1614 ship, the Onrust, which he used to explore the northeast coast of the Atlantic, including New York Harbor. Cruise includes delicious Dutch waffles.

Tickets are $75 for individuals, $140 for couples. Limited to 30 people. All proceeds benefit the

Hudson River Maritime Museum education programs.

To register, click "HERE"  or call 845-338- 0071 ext. 16.

More about the museum: Located along the historic Rondout Creek waterfront in downtown Kingston, NY, the Hudson River Maritime Museum is a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the maritime history of the Hudson River, its tributaries, and related industries. In 2016, HRMM opened the Riverport Wooden Boat School.

MEET THE OWNERS: Hamilton & Adams

HAMILTON & ADAMS

Saturday, April 8th, Hamilton & Adams tore down its brown paper and unveiled their store at 32 John Street.  For the first time, Uptown Kingston has its own destination shop specializing in men’s clothing, grooming products and giftware. We sat down with the owners Andrew Addotta and Clark Chaine for a personal tour and to talk shop.

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What a great addition to Uptown Kingston.  How did this all come about and can you tell us what inspired you two to start your own retail business?  

ANDREW: I have wanted to own my own business since I was 17.  I started working for a local farm and greenhouse and eventually spent the last 15 years of my professional career working for the GAP and DKNY.  I have loved Ulster County since my first visit in the summer of 2010 and knew I wanted to make it my home.  This store seemed like a natural choice based on our experiences, the community and the potential to grow both of those things together.  

Hamilton and Adams is very a catchy name, how did the name come about?  

CLARK: It’s our middle names!  I’m Clark Hamilton and he is Andrew Adam.  We wanted something authentic that could be easily perceived as a Men’s Store, but not limiting.  It was a quick decision.

Can you tell us about how you came up with the logo and if either of you can claim the design for it? 

CLARK: The tagline for Hamilton & Adams is Stay Curious, and by that we want to encourage people to engage and explore the world around them. The logo was designed with this thematic in mind as the binoculars are symbolic of looking forward and exploring new horizons. We are both history buffs so the name is relevant to notable historic figures, but it really ties back to us as our real middle names.

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What drew you to Kingston?  What’s the concept behind the store? 

ANDREW: Kingston is the heart of Ulster County and ultimately we believe it to be the heart of the Hudson Valley.  There was no doubt that the Stockade was the right place for us to open.  We’re just steps away from the Senate House (c.1676), amazing restaurants and bars within walking distance.  It’s overall an incredibly historical location.  There is a renaissance starting to take hold in Kingston. Everything from the Stockade Works movie production studio to the Kingston Stockade Soccer Club, people are doing fun and unique things in Kingston. We want to add to this momentum and be a part of this vibrant community. 

Who’s your customer?    

ANDREW:  We are a men’s shop, but want everyone to come in and see what we have selected to offer.  There are many brands, creators and artisans who we have selected to sit along with our apparel assortment.   We believe that we can be a destination for men as well as anyone who needs to buy something for the man in their life.

You both come from interesting backgrounds. Can you tell us about where you’re both from? 

ANDREW: I grew up outside of Buffalo, NY and went to Alfred for a degree in Horticulture.   I then went to Cornell and got my next degree in Marketing.  These two areas are really my passion and I believe this first step will allow me to continue leveraging them.  Clark is a 5th generation Californian who’s been in New York since December 2000 – upon arriving on the East Coast he’s been on a mission to explore as much of the land as possible and his career in media and marketing have taken him all over the world. We both have a very curious spirit always taking on new challenges and adventures which in turn has inspired our new endeavour. 

Andrew, you come with quite the retail experience, did you ever see yourself owning your own retail store? 

ANDREW: Always.  I love product and I love people.  I often feel like I can talk to anyone about anything.  I’m naturally a connector and love the energy from trying to meet people and fulfill their shopping desires.  We are both curious about the environment which we live in and experience and want to encourage others to be as well.  

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Your store is well designed and very authentic. How did you personalize the store to make it your own?   

CLARK: Every inch of the store speaks to our style and spirit. We were aligned on the creative direction from the start. We worked hard to make the store emblematic of who we are – casual yet interesting bringing in lots of historical moments for our customers to explore.  

How does your store align with the Upstate lifestyle and to Kingston? Do you carry any local products from the Hudson Valley?

ANDREW: We will continuously adapt the store based on customer feedback. We really want to be a resource for multiple demographics. The shop must be relevant for immediate local residents, weekenders and seasonal vacationers. We hope to have offerings that speak to each group, bringing them back over and over again. And yes we’re very focused on local products. We’re continuing to meet local artisans and craftsmen making everything from leather goods to natural skin care lines. We actually encourage your readers to reach out and let us know if they have a unique product offering that works for men – we’re all ears.

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What’s something people might be surprised to learn about you or your business? 

ANDREW: We’ve been dreaming about starting our own business for years, but no real activity. Then one day in early December a friend mentioned a vacant storefront on John Street. We looked at the space, which was the former DNC of Ulster County offices, and we took it…no business plan, no branding,  nothing. From that moment we had 3 months to build everything…and we made it and now we’re super excited to be part of the Kingston Uptown business community. We look forward to doing great things for our customers and the Upstate community.

Can we look to your store for any new Spring 2017 trends? 

ANDREW: Spring for us, and most of menswear right now, is about mixing comfort and the ability for pieces to serve multiple functions. Most of our items can be worn daytime/evening and workday to weekend.   We have focused on styles and brands that we ourselves wear and that we feel will resonate with anyone coming in.  We’re really trying to support smaller independent brands as well as American and locally made and owned brands.  

Any advice for inspiring entrepreneurs? 

CLARK: You just need to start. We had a dream, but needed a push to get the ball rolling. So I would suggest focus on your dream, don’t be afraid, and just do it! And don’t forget to ask for help- you’d be surprised how willing your friends and networks are, and how they can contribute in ways you would never imagine! 

Finally- are there any plans to relocate full time upstate? 

ANDREW: We are hoping to be able to invert our relationship between the 2 areas so we can spend the majority of our time in Kingston and then in NYC as needed.  Stay tuned.

 


See full spread below: 

 

 

Untapped Cities: NYC Weekend Trip: A Guide to Kingston in NY’s Hudson Valley

 michelle young 09/12/2016

There’s something to be said about a city whose mayor gives historical kayaking tours in his spare time. Kingston, the latest “it” city in the Hudson Valley, is a showcase on how to seamlessly meld historical and hip. Preserved Dutch homes sit side by side with street art murals painted on former industrial buildings, and there’s a palpable buzz from the economic revival going on, much of which centers around the arts and food. But it’s a city that also never forgets its roots – with three landmarked historic districts and shipyards that are still active. It’s no surprise that New Yorkers, particularly Brooklynites, are flocking there in droves, perhaps looking for a version of New York City that once was.

So far, the transplants have been mostly welcomed and long-time residents understand the interest. “It’s a city, in the middle of the country,” says Karin Clark Adin who owns the shop “Bop to Tottom, Gifts with a Twist,” on Wall Street in the Stockade Historic District. Indeed, the long colonnade storefronts along Wall Street give Kingston almost a Wild Wild West outpost feel – until you look at the stores within.

In a former Art Deco style bank is the headquarters of the Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, half a block from the Old Dutch Church. A few doors down, Outdated is a wonderfully curated cafe and antique shop with many mid-century throwbacks for sale including vintage Crayola crayon boxes and black and white marble composition notebooks. Uptown Coffee serves paleo biscuits, scones and a variety of wraps and sandwiches.

Duo Bistro, located in the Clermont Building, just opened a shop selling local Hudson Valley products, like our latest discovery, Horseshoe Brand hot sauce run by two husband and wife duos. Redwood Bar & Restaurant has a rooftop deck with table and bar seating and Stella’s has been an Italian restaurant stronghold since 1975. There’s an ongoing project to reopen the former Woolworth store into a food hall, and every weekend, a farmers market takes over an entire stretch of Wall Street starting from the Old Dutch Church.

The Stockade Historic District

The Friends of Historic Kingston give walking tours of this area, known as the Stockade Historic District, the largest intact early Dutch settlement in New York State. Highlights include The Ulster County Courthouse, where Sojourner Truth successfully sued to regain her son who had been sold a slave to a Southern slaveowner. Another must-see is the Federal style home of antiques dealer Fred J. Johnston, originally built by New York State Senator John Sudam. Johnston saved the house from demolition in 1938 and donated the house and his furniture collection. A gallery next door, also run by the Friends of Historic Kingston, showcases local history.

You’ll notice that the streets in the Stockade Historic District sound quite similar to those in downtown Manhattan – Wall Street, Front Street, Maiden Lane, John Street. That’s because these streets were planned out by none other than Peter Stuyvesant, the Dutch director general of New Amsterdam. The streets remain in exactly the same pattern as they were laid out in 1658.

Within the Stockade Historic District is the Four Corners, at the intersection of John Street and Crown Street. This is the only intersection in America where 18th century homes stand on all four corners – all of them built of stone. More than 20,000 artifacts were found in the Matthewis Person House during a multi-year restoration and archeological study and the house remains in a state that deliberately reveals the history within.

The Old Dutch Church is one of the storied locations where George Washington did indeed visit (there’s a signed letter from Washington graciously accepting the invitation to speak there). The church, founded in 1659, is an architectural gem by Minard LeFever, It was lauded by Calvert Vaux, one of the landscape architects for Central Park who proclaimed, “I cannot change a thing without impairing the exquisite unity. It’s ideally perfect.” A Louis Comfort Tiffany stained glass window, installed in 1891, is located behind the pulpit, and the Moeller Pipe Organ is one of the largest in the Hudson Valley. There’s also a small two-room Heritage Museum Archive inside, open by appointment with extensive geneological information, relics and old maps.

Meanwhile, the Senate House State Historic Site is literally where the state of New York was born in 1777 in the Dutch stone home of merchant Abraham Van Gaasbeck. Within the overall historic site, you can visit this house, built in phases between 1676 and the 18th century, the Senate House Museum, and the Loughran House, an Italianate style home. You can take an informative tour, about one hour long, of the inside of the Senate House.

NYC Weekend Trip: A Guide to Kingston in NY’s Hudson Valley

  michelle young 09/12/2016   ARCHITECTUREAROUND NYCARTS & CULTURENEW YORK

There’s something to be said about a city whose mayor gives historical kayaking tours in his spare time. Kingston, the latest “it” city in the Hudson Valley, is a showcase on how to seamlessly meld historical and hip. Preserved Dutch homes sit side by side with street art murals painted on former industrial buildings, and there’s a palpable buzz from the economic revival going on, much of which centers around the arts and food. But it’s a city that also never forgets its roots – with three landmarked historic districts and shipyards that are still active. It’s no surprise that New Yorkers, particularly Brooklynites, are flocking there in droves, perhaps looking for a version of New York City that once was.

So far, the transplants have been mostly welcomed and long-time residents understand the interest. “It’s a city, in the middle of the country,” says Karin Clark Adin who owns the shop “Bop to Tottom, Gifts with a Twist,” on Wall Street in the Stockade Historic District. Indeed, the long colonnade storefronts along Wall Street give Kingston almost a Wild Wild West outpost feel – until you look at the stores within.

In a former Art Deco style bank is the headquarters of the Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, half a block from the Old Dutch Church. A few doors down, Outdated is a wonderfully curated cafe and antique shop with many mid-century throwbacks for sale including vintage Crayola crayon boxes and black and white marble composition notebooks. Uptown Coffee serves paleo biscuits, scones and a variety of wraps and sandwiches.

Duo Bistro, located in the Clermont Building, just opened a shop selling local Hudson Valley products, like our latest discovery, Horseshoe Brand hot sauce run by two husband and wife duos. Redwood Bar & Restaurant has a rooftop deck with table and bar seating and Stella’s has been an Italian restaurant stronghold since 1975. There’s an ongoing project to reopen the former Woolworth store into a food hall, and every weekend, a farmers market takes over an entire stretch of Wall Street starting from the Old Dutch Church.

The Stockade Historic District

The Friends of Historic Kingston give walking tours of this area, known as the Stockade Historic District, the largest intact early Dutch settlement in New York State. Highlights include The Ulster County Courthouse, where Sojourner Truth successfully sued to regain her son who had been sold a slave to a Southern slaveowner. Another must-see is the Federal style home of antiques dealer Fred J. Johnston, originally built by New York State Senator John Sudam. Johnston saved the house from demolition in 1938 and donated the house and his furniture collection. A gallery next door, also run by the Friends of Historic Kingston, showcases local history.

You’ll notice that the streets in the Stockade Historic District sound quite similar to those in downtown Manhattan – Wall Street, Front Street, Maiden Lane, John Street. That’s because these streets were planned out by none other than Peter Stuyvesant, the Dutch director general of New Amsterdam. The streets remain in exactly the same pattern as they were laid out in 1658.

The Stockade District takes its name from the 14 foot tall wooden stockade walls built around this original street plan under the direction of Stuyvesant as protection against the Esopus Indians. Stuyvesant had also ordered the relocation of the Dutch settlers from the Esopus Creek, now the Rondout neighborhood, upland to an area that afforded more natural protection.

Within the Stockade Historic District is the Four Corners, at the intersection of John Street and Crown Street. This is the only intersection in America where 18th century homes stand on all four corners – all of them built of stone. More than 20,000 artifacts were found in the Matthewis Person House during a multi-year restoration and archeological study and the house remains in a state that deliberately reveals the history within.

Around here, numerous other notable stone houses remain, including the headquarters for the Daughters of the American Revolution and more. But if you’re looking to spend more time immersed in an old Dutch home, grab lunch in the Hoffman House Restaurant and Tavern on North Front Street, which was built before October 1679 and is nearly entirely in its original structural form. Just down the street is another Dutch stone house, the Louw-Bogardus House, preserved as a ruin.

The Old Dutch Church is one of the storied locations where George Washington did indeed visit (there’s a signed letter from Washington graciously accepting the invitation to speak there). The church, founded in 1659, is an architectural gem by Minard LeFever, It was lauded by Calvert Vaux, one of the landscape architects for Central Park who proclaimed, “I cannot change a thing without impairing the exquisite unity. It’s ideally perfect.” A Louis Comfort Tiffany stained glass window, installed in 1891, is located behind the pulpit, and the Moeller Pipe Organ is one of the largest in the Hudson Valley. There’s also a small two-room Heritage Museum Archive inside, open by appointment with extensive geneological information, relics and old maps.

As the Old Dutch Church grew in congregation over time, it expanded atop part of the cemetery, and 80 graves still lie beneath the current structure. Numerous Revolutionary War heroes are buried in the cemetery at the Old Dutch Church, whose gravestones are marked by American flags. The most notable is George Clinton, who was the Brigadier General of the Revolution, the first governor of New York State, and Vice President of the United States under both Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. A celebrity even nearly 100 years after his death, the relocation of his body and accompanying 19-ton monument from his original burial site in Washington D.C. to Kingston in 1908 was followed by throngs of well wishers, tens of thousands strong.

Meanwhile, the Senate House State Historic Site is literally where the state of New York was born in 1777 in the Dutch stone home of merchant Abraham Van Gaasbeck. Within the overall historic site, you can visit this house, built in phases between 1676 and the 18th century, the Senate House Museum, and the Loughran House, an Italianate style home. You can take an informative tour, about one hour long, of the inside of the Senate House.

The Rondout Historic District

Moving forward in time and further south geographically, the Rondout Historic District showcases the industrial fervor of Kingston around the Rondout Creek, which leads out to the Hudson River. The first company to arrive was the Cornell Steamboat Company, founded by Thomas Cornell, and part of the once-thriving steamboat business along the Hudson River. Incidentally, the S.S. Columbia, the oldest steamboat still in existence will make its way to the Hudson Valley next year to be rehabilitated right along this riverfront in Kingston. The Clearwater, the Hudson River sloop built by Pete Seeger as an environmental flagship vessel was also restored in Kingston, which is the home base for the boat.

The industrial activity of the Roundout was bolstered by the D&H Canal, which transported 3 million tons of coal in the year 1870 alone, and the Kingston trolley system, built by the son-in-law of Thomas Cornell. Like many post-industrial places in America, the Roundout did not escape the fervor of urban renewal in the 1960s. The east side of the strand along the waterfront was demolished but fortunately the west side remained, offering a glimpse into what the 19th century maritime village would have looked like. Notable buildings include the former Sampson Opera House and the Mansion House, a luxury hotel. Up on a bluff is the Chestnut Street Historic District, lined with handsome mansions built by the affluent merchants of the Rondout.

You can step inside the former Cornell Steamboat Company buildings by taking in a meal or drink at Ole Savannah, Southern Table & Bar which has outdoor seating along the creek. The Hudson River Maritime Museum is another place to take in the history of the Rondout. But besides the shipbuilding heritage, another highlight of the Rondout is the Trolley Museum of New York, located just across from Ole Savannah. Here you can see vintage trolleys, subways and rapid transit cars from all over the United States and Europe, and most notably recently, one of the last two PATH train cars from the World Trade Center on 9/11. (The other is located at the Shore Line Trolley Museum in East Haven, Connecticut).

Perhaps one of the most obvious connections in the Brooklyn to Kingston migration was the arrival of Smorgasburg, the famous Brooklyn food fair, in August this year. Smorgasburg Upstate, located in the abandoned Hutton Brickyards along ten acres of the Hudson River waterfront, features vendors from both Brooklyn and Hudson Valley purveyors, and mixes in elements from the Brooklyn Flea with a selection of vendors selling antiques, clothing and designs.

For those of the more outdoor bent, a great way to see the Rondout Creek is by kayak. A Day Away Kayak was founded by Kingston local Jesse Hicks, who started the business within his family’s marina as a teenager. He’ll point out a sunken, abandoned barge, remnants of an old D&H canal lock, and foundations of former bridge crossings. On our trip, amidst the stunning landscape, we sighted two bald eagles and a plethora of other wildlife.

Mid-Town Kingston

The most exciting development area of Kingston may be Mid-Town, an area with Victorian houses and main commercial area just starting its economic recovery. It may also be the area closest to the Brooklyn of yesteryear – where affordable, industrial spaces were turned into meccas for artists and entrepreneurs. Peace Nation Cafe, an organic Guatemalan joint, is the newest addition along Broadway, operating out of a former luncheonette. The proprietor of Peace Nation, Noé del Cid was running a sustainable clothing and event company out of Brooklyn but moved all the operations to Kingston upon seeing the opportunities in real estate. He bought the building at 636 Broadway and decided to open a cafe in the ground floor space. But like all the other places we’ve visited in Kingston, it’s the community that seems to keep people here, in addition to the irresistible sense of optimism pervading the city. Down the street, in an unused storefront dubbed the P(optimism) Shoppe, the artist Riley Johndonnell was doing an installation for a new Pantone color, International Optimism Yellow (INT-O Yellow) he created, collaborating with Ysanne, a multi-media sound artist from Brooklyn. Mid-Town even has its own coffee roaster, Monkey Joe, roasting single-origin specialty coffees.

The City of Kingston has its own “Pennsylvania Station,” a building that became a catalyst for historic preservation. A rotunda-style post office in Mid-Town was demolished to make way for a fast food joint. More than fifty years later, you can easily see the vastly different way historic structures are considered now. In Mid-Town, the Lace Mill, an affordable housing project perhaps best represents this new encompassing vision Kingston has for its citizens and newcomers. The US Lace Curtain Mill, built in 1903, was adaptively reused into housing, galleries, and a co-working space after decades of abandonment. It’s a stunning historic preservation restoration and creative placemaking effort that offers 55 affordable apartments with preference for artists.

The high ceilings of the factory offer unique units ranging from studios to three-bedrooms, with many multi-level duplexes. Green initiatives abound, including Kingston’s largest solar panel array, while history has been meticulously retained – including the original power plant within, former freight train tracks, and ghost signs on brick exterior.

Affordable housing developer RUPCO was behind the $18.9 million renovation. The firm is active in the Hudson Valley, creating housing and community spaces for a wide spectrum of end users from artists to the elderly. Nearby, RUPCO is redeveloping a former bowling alley into affordable rentals, tech incubator and community space; and actress Mary Stuart Masterson is working on a project with RUPCO to open a film and tech production hub called Stockade Works.

Amazingly, all of the above can be seen in a weekend in Kingston but it’s certainly a city worth many repeat visits. Kingston is an easy 2 to 2.5 hour bus ride on Trailways of New York from the Port Authority. You can also take Amtrak to Rhinebeck and cross the Hudson.

See the full article here: untappedcities

Hamilton & Adams

Welcome to Kingston, Hamilton & Adams, a new retail store front hitting 32 John Street in the heart of Uptown Kingston featuring quality goods and wears with a purpose….   Hamilton & Adams is a modern-day haberdashery inspiring people to stay curious about the world around them, while encouraging historical awareness and civic knowledge.

Explore and discover something new in the Hudson Valley/Kingston, NY. Apparel, Gifts, Historical curiosities and much more…

Come join them on their opening this Saturday, April 8th 10am-7pm.  

More photos to come after the launch. 

Hamilton & Adams
32 John Street, Kingston
(845) 383-1039


Comforter Cobblestone Thrift Store- Kingston

We just learned about this new thrift store called Comforter Cobblestone Thrift Store.  A not-for- profit thrift store featuring clothing for adults & children, jewelry, shoes, household and misc items.  It's located on one of the only 2 cobble stone streets in Kingston.  Drop by and do let us know what you think if you make it there before us.  Photos to come soon...

Open every Saturday 9-12

26 Wynkoop Place (basement of Church of the Comforter)
Entrance: In the basement, to the left of the church steps. Parking in church hall lot.
Kingston, NY 12401
Tel: 845.338.6126

Kingston Repair Cafe on November 19th

Kingston Repair Cafe on November 19th

Fix-it experts fix anything, for free!  Already in their third year of fixing and coaching Kingston customers on how to fix everything from lamps to lingerie. They will show you how to fix appliances, electrical products, mechanical things, large and small wooden items like furniture and knick-knacks, clothes and soft toys, - there are two people standing by with sewing machines and needle and thread.  They also have a professional bookbinder for your beloved book that is falling apart, also  china and glass, even a jewelry fixer. You bring it, they will fix it!  Bring  whatever you can’t get round to fixing but would love to have it work again. 

Stop by for a coffee and chat, cookies and cakes only 50 cents, meet your neighbors!

11-3pm at Clinton Avenue United Methodist Church, 122 Clinton Avenue, Kingston. www.repaircafehv.org  for more information.

The Deep Six on the Day of the Dead, November 1st

Join the Old Dutch Church in Kingston 7-9pm on November 1st for the Deep Six!  Six writers will read six genre-spanning readings on dying and death.   Music by Tyler Wood followed by a procession to the cemetery to honor, grieve and celebrate the dead.

Twenty Hudson Valley artists have created an altar for participants to place small objects of remembrance. Proceeds to benefit Circle of Friends for the Dying, a local nonprofit. Tickets are $15 at door and in advance. Tickets can be purchased "here".

For more information click "here" or vist CFD.

Savor Beauty- Grand Opening

Welcome to the block, Angela Jia Kim, owner of Savor Beauty + Spa. Savor Beauty is a natural skincare brand that offers specialty facials, beauty and well-being recommendations, award-winning spa treatments and makeup services. The skincare products are made-on-premise in their Beauty Kitchen and are used in the spa treatments. Since their opening in 2012 in the West Village, Savor Spa has drawn quite the following for its eco-beauty skincare products that uses mostly organic, natural, and sustainable ingredients.  

Photo:  Angela Jia Kim by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

Photo:  Angela Jia Kim by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

Savor Beauty’s natural skincare production and organic spa has now moved to Saugerties, NY.  The fully-renovated 5,000-square-foot facility’s centerpiece is the “Beauty Kitchen” where Savor’s award-winning organic skincare products are made. There are three treatment rooms with a team of four estheticians and three massage therapists. Guests can see masques and essential oils being mixed before their treatments, and shoppers discover the latest beauty trends and a curated collection of eco-makeup in Savor Beauty’s retail boutique. The second-floor Savor Loft is used for private events, workshops and classes. Savor Beauty’s founder Angela Jia Kim says, “My husband and I started coming up here six years ago, and the moment I discovered Saugerties, I fell in love with this town. I loved spending the afternoon speaking with the shop owners about their creation process, and I felt right at home here. I feel fortunate that we found the ideal space where we will be making the skincare products that I originally created in my kitchen in Manhattan. It’s the perfect place for us to keep creating all-natural beauty formulations, train the highest level of expertise in our estheticians and massage therapists, and treat guests to an atmosphere of relaxation and rejuvenation.”

We asked Angela to share some natural tips to protecting your skin from the sun.  Read the following to keep your skin radiant and clear during these hot summer months. 

“Wear paraben-free, eco-friendly and natural sunscreen. Ask any dermatologist for their best anti-aging treatment and you’ll get the same answer again and again. It’s wearing sunscreen on your face, every single day, without exception. A skin cooling and moisturizing sunscreen, COOLA Suncare SPF 30, body and face care relies on organic beeswax for an environmentally friendly answer to sweat- and water-resistance. Available at Savor Beauty; $36

Walk on the shaded part of the street. My Korean mom always taught me to run away from the sun. Korean beauty standards include pearly white skin, which inspired the Truffle Face Cream (high in vitamin B, which restores the skin’s luminosity) because dark skin once meant that you were a peasant, out in the field and working all day under the sun. Light skinned people were the nobility – they could afford to stay at home and out of the sun. This age-old belief has lent itself well into modern society with practical Korean beauty ritual advice: wear hats, cross over to walk in the shaded street, and avoid the sun at all cost. 

Cool off with a Beautyfood Smoothie. If your skin needs care after a day out in the sun, foods like papaya helps repair skin from the inside out." Angela

See Savor Beauty’s Green Beauty Guru Alise Marie’s smoothie recipe at www.beautyfoodrecipes.com/recipes

Join Angela and Savor Beauty + Spa for their Grand Opening on Friday, August 5th. 
114 Partition Street, Saugerties, NY

Savor will be offering complimentary mini facials, chair massages, product making demos, champagne, and craft beer made by her husband who is a home brewer.   

For reservations, please call 845.247.3758 or book online at:
savorspa.com or eventbrite

VIP Ticket Holders ($10 entrance fee, applied as credit toward any purchase that night!) will gain access beyond the Red Rope area to experience the following: 

  • Beauty-boosting mini facials
  • Stress-relieving chair massage
  • Complimentary champagne and #beautyfood treats
  • Goody bags worth $50 with any purchase
  • FREE Tarot Readings with any $75+ purchase
  • 10% off on Savor Beauty skincare that evening
  • Plus, a 10% exclusive when you book any spa service at the event
     
  • LIMITED SPACE! RSVP and first come, first served for VIP guests! 

Download the below high resolution Kingston Weekender spreads "here"

EXCLUSIVE: INTERVIEW WITH EVAN TAYLOR JONES // SHOW AT KEEGAN ALES AUG 26.

BY PHILIPPE TRINH // WWW.KINGSTONWEEKENDER.COM

When and what age did you start playing?
I started playing music at the age of 19.

What genre do you consider your work to be? 
Soul-rock or rock ‘n roll with a whole heap of soul. My major influences are and have always been Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Richie Havens, Jimi Hendrix, Prince and Lenny Kravitz. 

Who are your other band members?   
Tyler Hood plays lead guitar, Chris Faustian plays bass,Mikey Guzman and Matt Gutkin plays keys, Lydia Jorge is one of my background vocalists along with Akira Sledge, and Matt Wassum is our new young talented drummer.   

Where have you performed? Do you have any upcoming shows? 
I have performed all over the state of Florida and the Southeast from here to Tennessee and Alabama. My favorite venue is the House of Blues in Orlando which we will be playing at on July 30th to start off the tour. I have a lot of upcoming shows since we’ll be on tour. I am most looking forward to the NY dates, especially Keagan Ales which is happening on August 26th. I have heard great things about the venue and the sounds in there. It is big deal for me playing in New York, I’ve been told that it’s hard to get a show there. 

Who writes your songs and what are your main topics for your songs? 
I write all of my songs and the main topic behind most of them is love and happiness. I do not see the topic changing over time because I know that the ears in this world, the young and old will always need the two.

Which songs do you perform most frequently and why? 
The songs that I perform most frequently are Over Your Shoulder and Alike, they are my favorite originals and are the most requested. 

How do you balance your music into your life?
Luckily for me, music is my only job. I play a gig almost every night and receive my earnings at the end. It is a hustle. I do not have children but I do have a lovely lady in my life who is the most understanding and supportive person on the planet, hands down. She makes it easy to do what I do and continue moving forward with my passion, all the while knowing that I am only going to get busier until money creates more time for her and I. I say that in the least shallow way. 

What do you like to do outside of music that contributes to your musicality?
I like to sit in my garage and play a loop of guitar, bass and drums and improvise over it with lead guitar riffs. I have found that just playing in an improvisational setting can increase work ethic and skill level, greatly. 

What are you working on right now?
I am working on this interview ha ha. Most importantly, I am working on this tour and getting everything ready for us to leave and be comfortable on the road.

How can fans-to-be gain access to your music? 
Visit my Facebook and go to www.soundcloud.com/evantaylorjonesmusic

Last words?
Thank you for having me. It is my pleasure and I hope you all can make it to the show in Kingston. Much love, happiness and freedom.

Smorgasburg To Open Weekly Open Air Market In Upstate New York

Feb. 16, 2016  // PRNewswire


Smorgasburg, the wildly successful food and flea market offshoot of Brooklyn Flea is coming to Kingston and vicinity beginning June 4th.   The open-air market will feature dozens of upstate food vendors, plus local handmade goods and antiques on 10 gorgeous acres of the former Hutton Brickyards site on the banks of the Hudson River.  Delicious foods from local area chefs and purveyors like Outdated (Kingston) and Raven & Boar (East Chatham) will joinBrooklyn gastronomic all-stars such as Ramen Burger and Lumpia Shack to create the region's tastiest weekly destination. Also on the menu: Fresh produce, snacks and packaged foods from the likes of Sawkill Farm (Red Hook) as well as vintage and salvage finds from Factory Hill (Philmont). Wash it all down with a selection of the New York State craft beer while relaxing only steps from the river's edge.

"Bringing our movable feast to Upstate New York is the natural evolution for a company that's been celebrating and promoting local food businesses for the past decade," said Jonathan Butler who, along with Eric Demby, founded the Brooklyn Flea in 2008 and Smorgasburg in 2011. "There's a renaissance occurring in the creative economy in the Hudson Valley that we are looking forward to being a part of.  We think Kingston, with its central location, storied history, beautiful riverfront environment, and vibrant community, is the perfect place to pitch our tent (or in this case, tents)."

Abandoned with rusting structures for the past 30 years, the Hutton Brickyards site will undergo an initial clean up and reconstruction of some of the historic buildings and areas on the property as part of the launch of the market.  For decades the Brickyards was a leading provider of jobs to Kingston and supplier of bricks to New York City and beyond.  The opening of the site to the public, will offer visitors a magical slice of local history. New owner MWest Holdings has worked closely with Smorgasburg to preserve and activate the iconic steel structures that prior owners planned to tear down and turn into residential condos. The team is working closely withKingston officials to make sure the market and its associated use meets all the local regulations and requirements to assure the public's safety.

Recently elected Mayor of Kingston, Steve Noble has been instrumental in making the market a reality. "As an environmentalist and avid Hudson River kayaker, I've admired the beauty and faded grandeur of the Hutton Brickyards site for years," said Mayor Noble. "I'm thrilled that this historic site, an industrial engine for the city for much of the 20th Century, will be preserved and reborn as a hub of economic and cultural activity for the 21st Century. My administration is committed to fostering small business growth in Kingston and I see Smorgasburg as an integral part of the entrepreneurial ecosystem."

The opening of Smorgasburg on the site will mark the first time in three decades that the public will be able to access the site and enjoy the stunning views of the Hudson River and the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge. "We are so excited and proud to be the stewards of such an important property and to have a chance to use it to celebrate the region's agricultural roots and burgeoning food scene," said MWest President Karl Slovin. "Our goal is to carefully bring the Hutton Brickyards back to life with proven taste makers who love the history and urban archeology of the site as much as we do.  This is the first step in what we hope will be a long-term partnership with the community to make this site a rich cultural destination of choice for locals and tourists alike."

The Hutton Brickyards is located at 100 North Street in Kingston, NY, a short drive from historic Uptown Kingston and the Rondout neighborhood. Smorgasburg will be held on Saturdays starting June 4 through the end of October, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information or to apply to be a vendor please visit smorgasburg.com/upstate.  Smorgasburg is also launching a new market inDowntown Los Angeles every Sunday starting June 19.

Read more at: http://upstate.smorgasburg.com/info

Uptown Kingston ‘on the edge of a big renewal’

KINGSTON >> Uptown, the consensus goes, is on the upswing.


Kingston’s historic Stockade District is bustling with activity by small technology firms, eclectic retailers, mainstay businesses, an amped-up music scene and events that draw thousands of people.

Kevin Quilty, a longtime member of the Kingston Uptown Business Association (KUBA), said there’s no question the Uptown business district is fast becoming a hot spot.

“I think that, right now, we are on the edge of a big renewal in Uptown,’ Quilty said. “All the pieces are in place right now. ... We are in a very good place.”

Gone is the past incessant talk about Uptown being a ghost town that shoppers abandoned to go to the big-box stores and the malls in the town of Ulster, Quilty said.

“I don’t think there are any available spaces,” Quilty said of Uptown’s storefront occupation.

At the same time, the town of Ulster business district is suffering, having lost large J.C. Penney, Office Depot and Sport Authority stores in the past year and losing Macy’s in the coming months.

Quilty said there is a youthful revival that has spawned widespread interest in Uptown Kingston, and not just as a shopping area.

“I see unfamiliar faces on the streets, mostly they are younger, men and women, all communicating with each other,” he said.

Former Mayor Shayne Gallo, who led the city from the start of 2012 until the end of 2015, said the Uptown buzz is palpable.

“People come and see Uptown and think that this would be a good place to work, live and play,” Gallo said.

He noted, in particular, the annual New Year’s Eve celebration on Wall Street, which the organizers say is attended by a crowd in the thousands.

The O+ and Chronogram festivals also have been huge draws, while the summertime Kingston Farmers Market on one block of Wall Street draws crowds every Saturday.

Uptown also is getting buzz and a boost from a plan by three young entrepreneurs to bring a food emporium called the Kingston Food Exchange to the former F.W. Woolworth store on Wall Street.

Zach Lewis, Bradford Beckerman and Ben Giardullo are planning a $6 million undertaking to create the healthy food emporium in the long-vacant storefront.

The three men formed a company called BBG Ventures, while a company called 311 Partners, owned by Lewis’ father, Hugh, purchased the 35,000-square-foot Wall Street space for $475,000 at a bankruptcy sale.

The partners say they will turn the former five-and-dime store into a center for healthy food, complete with a 9,000-square-foot organic grocery and a small café, both on the main floor. The grocery store and cafe will have their own names. There also will be 9,000 square feet set aside on the main floor in which up to 12 vendors will be able to operate.

The basement is to have commercial kitchen facilities for rent and an area for on-site fresh cooking. There will also be a community space for food and cooking education, among other things.

Giardullo said the choice of Uptown Kingston had a lot to do with the vibrancy of the area.

“I think that Hudson River towns are seeing a rapid revitalization,’ he said. “I think a lot of young people who are like-minded progressive people are looking for better options than the higher rents in New York City.”

Giardullo said Kingston, including Uptown, is a walkable city with a number of features that lure investors and people who just want to live here.

“It is the overall lifestyle,” he said. “I think a number of people are looking for a better balance between work and access to nature. ... I think Kingston is really starting to pick up on these efforts and these demographics, and it’s happening all over Kingston, not just Uptown.”

Among other changes Uptown, the popular boutique Bop to Tottom moved in October from one storefront on Wall Street to another, giving itself more space. And the John Street restaurant Duo, around the corner from the old Bop to Tottom location, announced it would expand into the vacant space.

Tom Hoffay, the Uptown area’s former alderman and a lifelong Kingston resident, credited a burgeoning music and technology scene with aiding the Uptown revival.

“It is all centered around the music business and the computer business in Uptown,” Hoffay said, adding that reasonable rents in the area help attract millennials.

“If people can live or room over some of the venues, I think that is an attraction,” he said, citing BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) on Wall Street as one of the draws.

Hoffay also noted Pugsly’s Barbershop, a new Apple computer store, Vapology, the Exit 19 furniture store and Outdated, a stored billed as an “antiques café” where almost everything is for sale.

Aaron Sheldon of Highland, a partner in Vapology, said he and his associates were so impressed with Uptown that they signed a lease the same day they looked at the 39 North Front St. locations a few months ago.

The store offers accessories and other products relating to electronic cigarettes.

“We have a shop in Poughkeepsie and we were looking to expand,” Sheldon said. “We saw the [Uptown Kingston] space, and it is just such a beautiful building.”

He said the business is “doing well.”

KUBA President Jane Garity also is bullish on the Uptown area.

“I understand there’s nothing left for sale on Wall, Fair or John streets,” she said. “Everybody at KUBA is working together, and there’s lot’s of harmony. ...

“People are looking at us as a viable alternative to living in the city,” Garity said, referring to New York. “You have great access to the city, but you don’t have to be sitting in Manhattan every day.”

Staff writer Brian Hubert contributed to this report.

GETTING TO KNOW: BENJAMIN GIARDULLO

• Co-founder/CEO of BBG Ventures LLC, company establishing Kingston Food Exchange in former Woolworth store on Wall Street in Uptown Kingston.

• Sole proprietor of Hudson Valley Market LLC business development and food systems consulting.

• Independent sales at Hudson Valley Harvest LLC, Kingston-based distributor for 50 farms in Hudson Valley.

• Board of Directors chairman at Common Ground Farm, a Beacon-based non-profit farm focused on food access, food justice and food education programs.

• Lives in Beacon; co-founder/co-coordinator of Beacon Food Cooperative.

• Grew up in Rosendale, graduated from Rondout Valley High School and University of New Hampshire (bachelor’s degree in mathematics).

Read more from the Daily Freeman "here"



Kingston Repair Cafe

Kingston Repair Cafe at Clinton Avenue United Methodist Church, 122 Clinton  Avenue, Kingston. 

"We fix anything for free. Bring your broken but beloved small appliances, mechanical, electrical things, bring clothes and toys, wooden furniture and knickknacks, bring broken books, china, glass, jewelry. You bring it, we will try to fix it! Refreshments supplied."

11-3pm Saturday 23 January.

Www.repaircafehv.org

mail: kingstonrepaircafe@gmail.com