YOUR LOCAL GUIDE FOR KINGSTON, NY

 

THE SAINT JAMES KINGSTON: Located in the heart of Uptown Kingston, this gem is just minutes away from the infamous Stockade District's charming stores, restaurants and bars. 

The Saint James Kingston is a beautifully restored 1890’s Victorian home available for rent.  Recently featured on DesignSponge.com as one of the best places to stay! 

www.thesaintjamesny.com

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Kingston, NY is home to some of the best restaurants and bars in the country.   Some are run by graduates of the nearby Culinary Institute of America. 

Featured in numerous articles and publications such as The New York Times, restaurants and bars such as Boitson's and Stockade Bar have put Kingston back on the map again.  Plan your next trip to Kingston, New York today.

With hiking, swimming, apple picking, wine tasting and other outdoor activities at your fingertips, Kingston NY, is your one stop destination.  Kingston is centrally located to all of the best the Hudson Valley has to offer. 

Kingston is home to a large number of art galleries. Kingston has many festivals in the Rondout including the Kingston Jazz Festival.


Kingston, NY is only a 1 1/2 hour drive from NYC.  It's the perfect getaway for a vacation upstate filled with lots of fun activities, shopping, thrifting, restaurants and bars.  If you don't have a car, there are lots of lodgings in town (www.thesaintjames.com) so book your next trip to Kingston via bus at Adirondak Trailways.  The bus in NYC is located at Port Authority and drops you off in the heart of the town, Uptown Kingston.

 

Upstate House Spotlight on Kingston, NY: CITY OF QUIET COOL

In the fall of 2012, a young artist and a tattooist secretly began spray-painting red goats throughout Kingston’s Uptown Stockade district. Some condemned the red goats as vandalism; others lauded them as public art. Either way, the goats became something of a brand for Kingston; those same images of red goats showed up in far-off places like Brooklyn, Missouri, Miami, and even Canada, warranting a story in the New York Times.

Read the full article "HERE"

 

Nov 19, 2013

Design Sponge on Outdated: An Antique Cafe // Maxwell Tielman

OUTDATED: A CATSKILLS CAFE WHERE (ALMOST) EVERYTHING IS FOR SALE

"Two of my favorite kinds of places are coffee shops and antique stores, so you cannot believe how thrilled I was to discover a place in Upstate New York that combines the best of both. Outdated, a large space located on Wall Street in Kingston’s historic Stockade District, has been dubbed an “antique cafe” by its founders, Gabriel Constantine and Tarah Gay and combines the couple’s two passions—vintage furniture and food. “We had our first date at a flea market and the rest is history,” says Gabriel. “During the years of buying antiques and vintage around the Hudson Valley, we began dreaming up the idea for Outdated.” The result is an open but endlessly inviting space—one part shop, one part restaurant, and one part dazzling museum of curiosities. With ample seating space and a few sofas and coffee tables thrown into the mix, being at Outdated is akin to being in a living room away from home. Add in the delicious, locally-sourced food, baked goods, and coffee and you have a wonderful (and dangerous) combination. Check out the rest of the photos plus Gabriel and Tarah’s notes about the space after the jump!" 

View the entire article here: Design Sponge


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KINGSTON ON DESIGN SPONGE

Oct 14, 2013

Kingston is having a great year!  We're proud to be posting another great post from Design Sponge.  The home happens to be the second Kingston New York home to be featured this year on the popular blog site.  

Read Maxwell's article below from Design Sponge: 

"My neighbor John McKinney is an optometrist with a serious eye for design (pun absolutely, shamelessly intended). Although his days are filled with eye charts, optical exams, and glasses fittings, his evenings and weekends are packed with trips to local auctions, estate sales, and flea markets—all part of his tireless and passion-driven journey to renovate and furnish his 1723 house in the heart of uptown Kingston, New York. John’s home, an absolutely stunning stone construction, is a a gem amongst gems—one of the neighborhood’s oldest and longest-standing structures, dating back to Kingston’s pre-Revolution days when it originally functioned as the town’s Elmendorf Tavern. It has survived not just the Revolutionary War and the infamous 1777 burning of Kingston, but centuries of change. Nineteenth century Italianate and Victorian homes have sprung up around it, but this quaint colonial construction has remained one of the area’s most beautiful homes.

Throughout my first months as a Kingston resident, I had always admired John’s home when walking past it on trips to the city’s center, but I was absolutely floored when I was first welcomed inside for afternoon cocktails. After purchasing the home from a former medical practice five years ago, John has been painstakingly renovating it to its former glory—right down to period-appropriate antique furnishings and woodwork. John’s loving commitment to his home is clear in every detail—and the story of how he purchased the home and ultimately furnished it in its colonial and colonial revival style is downright fascinating. John’s previous home—a split-level ranch filled exclusively with midcentury modern furnishings—was a far cry from the pre-Revolution styles he currently surrounds himself with. When he put his former home on the market five years ago, though, the purchaser chose to buy with one proviso: that the home come with all of its furnishings. Despite having obsessively culled all of the home’s authentic Modernist pieces over the years, John split with them willfully and amicably, relishing the opportunity to start fresh. Although John seems to have broken up with his midcentury obsession when he broke up with his former home, the colonial style, with its hallmark simplicity, has proven to be an unexpected compliment to his eye for the clean, modern line. “As long as you keep it simple,” he notes, “it’s all ‘modern’ for that time period. If you pick the right pieces from each time period, you can see the clean lines in it.” John’s house might have a 1723 date on it, but its classic styling and timeless beauty makes it right at home in the twenty-first century. —Max"

 

See the complete photo gallery and article on "DESIGN SPONGE"


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KINGSTON'S WEALTHY LEGACY GETS NEW LIFE

UPSTATE COMMUNITY ON HUDSON APPEALS TO SECOND-HOME BUYERS

September, 2013

With its rich history andburgeoning small-business and dining scene, upstate New York's Kingston is increasingly on the radar of second-home buyers.  

"IT'S GOT INTERESTING ARCHITECTURE AND THE PRICES ARE RIGHT," HE SAID. "WE HAVE THE CATSKILL MOUNTAINS, THE HUDSON RIVER AND FARMS, BUT IT'S NOT POKY."

Full story here: The Wall Street Journal


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UPTOWN KINGSTON HOME FEATURED ON DESIGN SPONGE

September, 2013.

Kingston got some great press with this feature of The Saint James Kingston on DesignSponge.com. Owners, Philippe Trinh and Julian Lesser restored their old Victorian/Tudor house into a "neighborhood gem". Read below what Design Sponge had to say about their home:

"I had never met Julian Lesser and Philippe Trinh, a New York City-based artist/designer couple, when I stayed at their house for the first time. Their home, dubbed “The Saint James,” doubles as a weekend retreat for travelers and, last winter, I had the pleasure of staying there with a few friends. Located in the middle of Kingston, New York, a charming Hudson Valley town seemingly ripped from the pages of a Normal Rockwell book, the cozy house is filled with a mixture of modern and vintage finds, rustic charm, and quiet decadence. From its lavishly appointed sitting room, outfitted in stylish hood chairs and antique pieces, to the organic vegetable garden in the back, I got the sense that transforming this house had been quite an undertaking—a labor of love and countless years of work.

It wasn’t until Philippe invited my boyfriend and I back to The Saint James for a celebratory cocktail after we, too, had become Kingston residents, that the truth behind their renovation finally came to light. To our surprise, the magic-power couple had only closed on the 1890s Victorian mere months before our stay. During just this brief period, Julian and Philippe had taken the home from a sad state of disrepair—a ragged, un-landscaped exterior, and an interior broken and desecrated by years of vandals, squatters, and weather—to a state of near-completion. For anybody who has taken on a home renovation of their own, the transformation—often wrought by the couple’s own four hands—is downright vexing. While the home is still being tweaked and updated, albeit at a slightly slower pace these days, what was once a dilapidated house amongst the area’s more stately homes is now a neighborhood gem. " —Max 

DesignSponge.com


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MICHAEL C HALL IN KINGSTON:

Sept, 2013

If you see've Michael C Hall lurking around Kingston in the Hudson Valley in July and August, you might  be asking yourself why? Michael C Hall was indeed staying in Kingston during the filming of his new film, Cold in July.  He was spotted all around town from drinking tequila at Stockade Tavern, to having a bite at Duo Bistro and Yum Yum to drinking coffee at Outdated Cafe.  

Michael C Hall aka Dexter was staying at The Saint James Kingston (www.theSaintJamesNY.com)during the filming of his new It's the fourth film this year that has been filmed in the Hudson Valley!  

Michael C Hall rented out the entire property with all bedrooms and access to The Saint James' gardens and outdoor grounds for over 5+ weeks!  Michael loved staying at the home and said that it was "beautifully appointed".  If you want to stay in the same property that Michael C Hall stayed, click "here" to learn more about The Saint James.


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THE NEW YORK TIMES: 36 HOURS IN THE HUDSON VALLEY

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